Luxembourg Gardens

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on Reddit

 

Luxembourg Gardens

Most Parisians will tell you that the Luxembourg Gardens is their favourite park in Paris.

 

It is easy to see why. . .

 

 

With the imposing Luxembourg Palace overlooking the pond, flaneurs strolling the wide thoroughfares, chairs scattered around for a welcoming relax, over one hundred statues, and the pretty Medici Fountain, are enough reasons for this wonderful park to be a favourite.

 

Henri IV’s widow, Marie de Medici commissioned the palace in 1621 to imitate Pitti Palace, as she was homesick for her native Florence.

The original garden measuring 8 hectares, underwent considerable work, installing the pond, which remains today, the Medici Fountain, which has since had a pond added to it and the planting of 2000 elm trees.

After purchasing more land, 18 years later, Marie de Medici enlarged the park to 30 hectares.

 

The garden fell into disrepair after the death of Marie de Medici and by 1780, the future King, Louis XVIII, sold off a portion of the land for redevelopment. 

After the French Revolution the park grew to 40 hectares, and Jean Chalgrin, the architect of the Arc de Triomphe faithfully restored the park to its former glory.

Luxembourg Gardens didn’t escape Baron Haussmann’s grand redevelopment of the city.  

The park lost 15 hectares to allow for the wide boulevards to run up to the park and the Medici Fountain, although saved, was moved.

 

The placement of statues in the park began in 1848, the first of these were the Queens of France and famous women of France.

Later in 1880, and the 10 years that followed, famous writers and artists were added to the statuary as was a scaled down version of Bartholdi’s Statue of Liberty.

 

TODAY, the park offers such features as a children’s play area, tennis courts, an apple and pear orchard, an old carousel, puppet shows, a café, a gazebo, where musicians play and an orangerie, that holds art and photographic exhibitions.

The Queens of France and famous women of France surround the main basin.  The statue to the right, Le Marchand des Masques, can be found on the south eastern corner and the Fountain de Medics to the left of the Palace.  

Below you will find a fabulous and informative official link to the Luxembourg Palace, which provides a detailed map, on where to find each statue. 

If you have internet connection, you can refer to the map, as you stroll through the park. 

 

The Details

Luxembourg Gardens
Rue de Médicis
Rue de Vaugirard
Paris 75006   MAP
 
Nearest Metro
Odéon, Notre Dame des Champs
 
Opening Times
depending on the season
7.30-8.30am till dusk
 
Fabulous official map for statues
 
 
You Might Also LikeCovered PassagewaysParis MuseumsParks & Gardens
  • Parc Monceau
    Parc Monceau
    Only a short stroll from the Champs Elysees and the Arc de Triomphe with a pretty lily pond and surrounded by elegant homes.
  • Luxembourg Gardens
    Luxembourg Gardens
    Most Parisians will tell you the Luxembourg Gardens is their favourite park, it is easy to guess why.
  • Jardin des Tuileries
    Jardin des Tuileries
    The Tuileries history unfolds like a terrific saga. Once home to a Palace, Kings and Queens, a riding school, menagerie, hunting, fire and massacre.
  • Secret Garden Hôpital Hôtel-Dieu
    Secret Garden Hôpital Hôtel-Dieu
    A secret garden in an unusual location, right in the centre of Paris that thousands of tourists pass by each day without knowing it exists.
  • Le Passage des Princes
    Le Passage des Princes
    Amber lamps, giving off a warm, golden glow, with a beautiful glass ceiling, the entire passageway is dedicated to toys.
  • Passage Verdeau
    Passage Verdeau
    Explore antiques, rare books and vintage postcards beneath the elegant, neoclassical, glass ceiling, then continue over the road to Passage Jouffroy.
  • Passage Jouffroy
    Passage Jouffroy
    Sift through old books at the famous bookstore; Librairie Paul Vulin as you walk upon geometric black, white and grey tiles and discover the quaint Hotel Chopin.
  • Passage des Panoramas
    Passage des Panoramas
    Built in 1799 and inspired by the Oriental Souks, Passage des Panoramas is one of the oldest passageways in the world.
  • Passage du Caire
    Passage du Caire
    A unique façade, a magnificent glass ceiling, 360 metres in length, Passage du Caire is the oldest and longest Passage in Paris
  • Passage du Grand Cerf
    Passage du Grand Cerf
    Natural light drenches this elegant passageway from its 12 metre high glass ceiling with unique boutiques.
  • Passage du Prado
    Passage du Prado
    Rarely mentioned in travel guides, with not a tourist in sight, this unique passage was once in the heart of fashionable Paris.
  • Passage du Bourg l’Abbé
    Passage du Bourg l’Abbé
    Subtle and elegant pastel interior, muted by natural light from the unusual curved glass ceiling.
  • Musée Jacquemart-André
    Musée Jacquemart-André
    I love poking around former residences of the bourgeois and Musée Jacquemart-Andre is one of the finest you will see in Paris.
  • Maison de Victor Hugo
    Maison de Victor Hugo
    Nestled in a corner of Place des Vosges, is the former home of famous author of the Hunchback of Notre Dame; Victor Hugo.
  • Passage de l’Ancre
    Passage de l’Ancre
    Who would know a delightful, tranquil little piece of paradise could be hidden away behind an unassuming crooked doorway in the heart of Paris.
  • Musée Nissim de Camondo
    Musée Nissim de Camondo
    A splendidly elegant mansion and former home of the Camondo's with an evocative, unforgettably tragic family history.
  • Musée des Arts Forains
    Musée des Arts Forains
    Transport yourself back in time. Ride spectacular antique carousels, play ancient fair-ground games and admire colourful memorabilia.
  • Musée de la Vie Romantique
    Musée de la Vie Romantique
    Tucked away behind an unassuming green gate, you will discover this enchanting hôtel particulier. An absolute delight.
  • Fondation Louis Vuitton
    Fondation Louis Vuitton
    Nothing short of spectacular, offering panoramic views and modern art, this new museum is sure to become another Paris icon.
  • Petit Palais
    Petit Palais
    Not as small as its name suggests. Elaborate ceiling murals, magnificent mosaics, grand staircases a pretty garden café and it is free.
  • Muséum national d’histoire naturelle
    Muséum national d’histoire naturelle
    This museum would have to be the most dramatic and stylishly arranged natural history museum in the world. Be dazzled in awe ....
  • Musée Cognacq-Jay
    Musée Cognacq-Jay
    This stunning home of Samaritaine Department store founder, Ernest Cognacq-Jay and his wife Marie-Louise Jay, includes Fragonard, Rembrandt, Cézanne ...
  • Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature
    Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature
    This wonderfully, quirky, informative, interactive museum, doesn't take itself too seriously. Exploring the history of hunting.
  • Musée Bourdelle
    Musée Bourdelle
    Former home and studio of the artist; Antoine Bourdelle, who was famous for his monumental public statues and friezes, is an exceptional free museum.
  • Musée Zadkine
    Musée Zadkine
    The small sun drenched former home of Ossip Zadkine allow light to bounce off African influenced work, giving the museum a quiet sense of calm and elegance.
  • Musée Rodin
    Musée Rodin
    The newly renovated mansion and former home of the artist, has an equally rich and inspiring history as Monsieur Auguste Rodin himself and then there are the gardens.
  • Square Saint-Gilles Grand Veneur
    Square Saint-Gilles Grand Veneur
    Hidden away behind the Hôtel du Grand Veneur in the Marais is a little known secret square with a surprising artistic connection.
  • Maison La Roche – Foundation Le Corbusier
    Maison La Roche – Foundation Le Corbusier
    At the end of a leafy private lane is an iconic tribute to the architect of modern architecture.
  • Musée Carnavalet
    Musée Carnavalet
    Located in the heart of the Marais, this museum is dedicated to the history of Paris. Boasting 600,000 pieces, ranging from the 17th to 20th centuries.
  • Palais de Tokyo
    Palais de Tokyo
    Contemporary and cutting edge exhibitions of modern art, a very chic restaurant, late night openings until 12am and a great view of the Eiffel Tower.
  • Musée d’Orsay
    Musée d’Orsay
    The former railway station, sitting on the left bank of the Seine, has the largest collection of impressionist and post impressionist art in the world.
 
If you find this information useful, please thank me, by leaving a comment, liking me on facebook or plus one me on google+   Merci !
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on Reddit

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.